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The routes of Camino de Santiago

The Camino de Santiago is not just one. Although the French way is the most famous of all the pilgrimage routes to the city of Santiago de Compostela, it is not the only one. We will quickly tell you about the different options for your adventure arriving in Santiago.

Camino del Norte: Etapas, Mapas y Opiniones | Santiago Ways

French Way of Camino de Santiago

It is the best known route, it leaves from Saint Jean Pied de Port, on the French border, entering Navarre through Roncesvalles, the first stop on French territory. From there, the following stages as followed:

Stage 1: Saint Jean Pied de Port – Roncesvalles 25 kms
Stage 2: Roncesvalles – Zubiri 21 kms
Stage 3: Zubiri – Pamplona 20 kms
Stage 4: Pamplona – Puente la Reina 23 kms
Stage 5: Puente la Reina – Estella 21 kms
Stage 6: Estella – Torres del Río 29 kms
Stage 7: Torres del Río – Logroño 20 kms
Stage 8: Logroño – Nájera 29 kms
Stage 9: Nájera – Santo Domingo de la Calzada 21 kms
Stage 10: Santo Domingo de la Calzada – Belorado 24 kms
Stage 11: Belorado – Agés 27 kms
Stage 12: Agés – Burgos 23 kms
Stage 13: Burgos – Hontanas 31 kms
Stage 14: Hontanas – Boadilla del Camino 28 kms
Stage 15: Boadilla del Camino – Carrión de los Condes 24 kms
Stage 16: Carrión de los Condes – Terradillos de los Templarios 26 kms
Stage 17: Terradillos de los Templarios – El Burgo Ranero 30 kms
Stage 18: El Burgo Ranero – León 37 kms
Stage 19: León – San Martín del Camino 26 kms
Stage 20: San Martín del Camino – Astorga 24 kms
Stage 21: Astorga – Foncebadón 26 kms
Stage 22: Foncebadón – Ponferrada 27 kms
Stage 23: Ponferrada – Villafranca del Bierzo 24 kms
Stage 24: Villafranca del Bierzo – O Cebreiro 28 kms
Stage 25: O Cebreiro – Triacastela 21 kms
Stage 26: Triacastela – Sarria 25 kms
Stage 27: Sarria – Portomarín 24 kms
Stage 28: Portomarín – Palas de Rei 25 kms
Stage 29: Palas de Rei – Arzúa 29 kms
Stage 30: Arzúa – Pedrouzo 19 kms
Stage 31: Pedrouzo – Santiago 20 kms
These are the stages that you do and we put on your maps. One last! The truth is that, although the most common way is to walk the Camino de Santiago, it is not the only way. Many of you have sent us your bike path, sometimes starting from León, or Burgos.

There are even those who dare to do half walking and the other half by bicycle. Congratulations to all! Here we show you some of the maps that you have asked us.

The central Portuguese Camino de Santiago & the Coast Portuguese Camino de Santiago

The Portuguese Way is the second busiest route after the French Way, there are currently two variants: the Central Portuguese Way and the Portuguese Way along the Coast.

The central Portuguese Way passes through the interior of Portugal and Galicia, its route continues in part along the Via XIX which was one of the most important Roman roads that connected Braga and Astorga. Approximately 600 kilometers separate Lisbon from Santiago, from Porto the distance is about 240 kilometers and from Tui in Galicia there is a distance of 119 kilometers.

This last section from Tui is one of the most requested since it allows to request the Compostela and can be done in 5 stages of 20-25 kilometers a day that can be completed in just 7 days and 6 nights.

Below we break down the stages of the Central Portuguese Camino de Santiago with its corresponding kilometers

Stage 1: Lisbon – Alhandra 33 kms
Stage 2: Alhandra – Azambuja 24 kms
Stage 3: Azambuja – Santarém 32 kms
Stage 4: Santarém – Golegã 30.5 kms
Stage 5: Golegã – Take 22 kms
Stage 6: Tomar – Alvaiazere 32 kms
Stage 7: Alvaiazere – Rabaçal 33 kms
Stage 8: Rabaçal – Coimbra 32 kms
Stage 9: Coimbra – Mealhada 23 kms
Stage 10: Mealhada – Águeda 31 kms
Stage 11: Águeda – Albergaria a Velha 19.5 kms
Stage 12: Albergaria to Velha – Oliveira de Azeméis 23 kms
Stage 13: Oliveira de Azeméis – Grijó 33.5 kms
Stage 14: Grijó – Porto 23.5 kms
Stage 15: Porto – Vilarinho 37 kms
Stage 16: Vilarinho – Barcelos 16.4 kms
Stage 17: Barcelos – Ponte de Lima 33.6 kms
Stage 18: Ponte de Lima – Rubiães 17 kms
Stage 19: Rubiães – Tui 19 kms
Stage 20: Tui – O Porriño 18 kms
Stage 21: O Porriño – Redondela 15 kms
Stage 22: Redondela – Pontevedra 18 kms
Stage 23: Pontevedra – Caldas de Reis 23 kms
Stage 24: Caldas de Reis – Padrón 18 kms
Stage 25: Padrón – Santiago 25 kms

The Portuguese Way along the Coast begins in Porto and joins the Central Portuguese Way in Redondela entering Galicia through A Guarda, below we break down its stages
Stage 1: Porto – Labruge 24 kms
Stage 2: Labruge – Póvoa de Varzim 16 kms
Stage 3: Póvoa de Varzim – Marinhas 25 kms
Stage 4: Marinhas – Viana do Castelo 24 kms
Stage 5: Viana do Castelo – Caminha 29 kms
Stage 6: Caminha – Mougás 25 kms
Stage 7: Mougás – Ramallosa 16 kms
Stage 8: Ramallosa – Vigo 20 kms
Stage 9: Vigo – Redondela 17 kms
The Camino de Santiago across the North of Spain

The Camino del Norte is the third busiest route on the Camino de Santiago and one of the oldest. It has always been said that this is the toughest version of the road. It runs along the coast of Asturias and enters Galicia through Ribadeo. From Irún to Santiago the approximate distance is 825 kilometers.

Below we break down all the stages of the Camino del Norte from Irún:

Stage 1: Irún – San Sebastián 27.6 kms
Stage 2: San Sebastián – Zarautz 20.5 kms
Stage 3: Zarautz – Deba 22 kms
Stage 4: Deba – Markina 24.3 kms
Stage 5: Markina – Gernika 25 kms
Stage 6: Gernika – Lezama 22 kms
Stage 7: Lezama – Bilbao 11 kms
Stage 8: Bilbao – Portugalete 19.7 kms
Stage 9: Portugalete – Pobeña 12.3 kms
Stage 10: Pobeña – Castro Urdiales 23.5 kms
Stage 11: Castro Urdiales – Laredo 30.6 kms
Stage 12: Laredo – Güemes 29.5 kms
Stage 13: Güemes – Santander 20.5 kms
Stage 14: Santander – Santillana del Mar 37 kms
Stage 15: Santillana del Mar – Comillas 22 kms
Stage 16: Comillas – Colombres 25.6 kms
Stage 17: Colombres – Llanes 20 kms
Stage 18: Llanes – Ribadesella 28 kms
Stage 19: Ribadesella – Sebrayo 31.5 kms
Stage 20: Sebrayo – Gijón 34 kms
Stage 21: Gijón – Avilés 22.7 kms
Stage 22: Avilés – Soto de Luiña 38 kms
Stage 23: Soto de Luiña – Cadavedo 24 kms
Stage 24: Cadavedo – Luarca 17 kms
Stage 25: Luarca – La Caridad 29 kms
Stage 26: La Caridad – Ribadeo 22 kms
Stage 27: Ribadeo – Lourenzá 29 kms
Stage 28: Lourenzá – Abadín 25 kms
Stage 29: Abadín – Vilalba 21 kms
Stage 30: Vilalba – Baamonde 21 kms
Stage 31: Baamonde – Sobrado dos Monxes 41 kms
Stage 32: Sobrado dos Monxes – Arzúa 21.5 kms
Stage 33: Arzúa – Pedrouzo 19 kms
Stage 34: Pedrouzo – Santiago 20 kms
The primitive route of Camino de Santiago

Did you think that the French way was the oldest? This is a generalized thought, but the reality is that it is not like that. The Primitive Way is the oldest pilgrimage route as its name suggests and was recognized as a World Heritage Site in 2015.

This route that connects Oviedo with Santiago de Compostela was used by the illustrious King Alfonso II El Casto to confirm the discovery from the tomb of Santiago Apóstol. The Primitive Way from Oviedo has an approximate length of 322 kilometers and connects with the French Way in Melide, if you want to start from Galicia the section from Fonsagrada to Santiago has an approximate distance of 160 kilometers and can be done in just 9 days and 7 stages . This route of the Camino de Santiago has some stages of complex profile with landscapes of great beauty passing through such emblematic cities as Oviedo and Lugo.

Below we break down the stages of the Camino Primitivo

Stage 1: Oviedo – San Juan de Villapañada 30 kms
Stage 2: San Juan de Villapañada – Rooms 20 kms
Stage 3: Salas – Tineo 20 kms
Stage 4: Tineo – Pola de Allande 28 kms
Stage 5: Pola de Allande – La Mesa 22 kms
Stage 6: La Mesa – Grandas de Salime 17 kms
Stage 7: Grandas de Salime – A Fonsagrada 28 kms
Stage 8: A Fonsagrada – Cádavo Baleira 26 kms
Stage 9: Cádavo Baleira – Lugo 30 kms
Stage 10: Lugo – San Romao da Retorta 20 kms
Stage 11: San Romao da Retorta – Melide 28 kms
Stage 12: Melide – Arzúa 14 kms
Stage 13: Arzúa – Pedrouzo 19 kms
Stage 14: Pedrouzo – Santiago 20 kms
Via de la Plata

This route of the Camino de Santiago runs along part of the Roman road that connected Mérida and Astorga, with the advance of the Christian conquest the Jacobean itinerary was extended to Seville. This itinerary of the Camino de Santiago connects with the French Way in Astorga. From Seville to Santiago there are approximately 965 kilometers, this distance can be done in 33 stages.

Below we break down the stages of the Vía de la Plata

Stage 1: Seville – Guillena 23 kms
Stage 2: Guillena. Castilblanco de los Arroyos 17.5 kms
Stage 3: Castilblanco de los Arroyos – Almadén de la Plata 29 kms
Stage 4: Almadén de la Plata – Monesterio 34.5 kms
Stage 5: Monesterio – Cantos Fountain 21.5 kms
Stage 6: Cantos Fountain – Zafra 24.5 kms
Stage 7: Zafra – Almendralejo 36.7 kms
Stage 8: Almendralejo – Mérida 29.6 kms
Stage 9: Mérida – Alcuéscar 36 kms
Stage 10: Alcuéscar – Valdesalor 25.7 kms
Stage 11: Valdesalor – Casar de Cáceres 23 kms
Stage 12: Casar de Cáceres – Cañaveral 33.2 kms
Stage 13: Cañaveral – Galisteo 28 kms
Stage 14: Galisteo – Cáparra 29.5 kms
Stage 15: Cáparra – Baños de Montemayor 28.5 kms
Stage 16: Baños de Montemayor – Fuenterroble de Salvatierra 33 kms
Stage 17: Fuenterroble de Salvatierra – San Pedro de Rozados 28 kms
Stage 18: San Pedro de Rozados – Salamanca 23.5 kms
Stage 19: Salamanca – The Cube of the Land of Wine 35 kms
Stage 20: The Cover of the Land of Wine – Zamora 31.5 kms
Stage 21: Zamora – Montamarta 18.5 kms
Stage 22: Montamarta – Moreruela Farm 22.7 kms
Stage 23: Moreruela Farm – Benavente 25.5 kms
Stage 24: Benavente – Alija del Infantado 22 kms
Stage 25: Alija del Infantado – La Bañeza 20.5 kms
Stage 26: La Bañeza – Astorga 24 kms
Stage 27: Astorga – Foncebadón 26 kms
Stage 28: Foncebadón – Ponferrada 27 kms
Stage 29: Ponferrada – Villafranca del Bierzo 24 kms
Stage 30: Villafranca del Bierzo – O Cebreiro 28 kms
Stage 31: O Cebreiro – Triacastela 21 kms
Stage 32: Triacastela – Sarria 25 kms
Stage 33: Sarria – Portomarín 24 kms
Stage 34: Portomarín – Palas de Rei 25 kms
Stage 35: Palas de Rei – Arzúa 29 kms
Stage 36: Arzúa – Pedrouzo 19 kms
Stage 37: Pedrouzo – Santiago 20 kms
Camino Walks – Follow the Camino

These are the five best known types of the Camino de Santiago, but did you know that there are two English versions that arrive by boat from the British island? Really the options to make this trip historically recognized and known by all, are many.

It is really a special trip, not only because of the path, the landscape, the culture and the gastronomy that we can find along our way, but also as a unique experience.

What are you waiting for? Prepare your Camino de Santiago, we wait here to make a map of that unique stellar journey!

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